This is a website dedicated to the theories and speculations I have developed about A Song of Ice and Fire. Many of these theories have been inspired by the ASOIAF community, though the content of this site is entirely my own. All artwork is taken from bing.com/images.

The articles on this site presume that readers are familiar with ASOIAF. Or at least with the tv show. I am not going to go into detail on every point because this is not intended to be an academic exercise.

Before I begin I think I need to suggest something I know will not be popular. It has to do with the extended history of ASOIAF and the world it is set on. People are in love with Martin’s creation and endless hours have been spent on speculating what the truth of his mythology is. I think it’s long past time for people to face the possibility that there is no correct answer.

The reason why is complicated, but anyone who is an old-school Dungeons&Dragons player probably knows what I’m talking about. I have long known that Martin’s world, which others have named Planatos, has all the characteristics of a game world. This is hardly surprising as Martin was an avid gamer when he was younger. As those of us who were old-school gamers  can testify to, the desire to create your own world was very powerful. Most were never very serious about it. Certainly not to the point of creating Skyrim level details. But there were those few who went to great lengths to give their worlds’ massive depth and realism. Martin clearly fits into this category.

I don’t know if Martin ever played his game world. I’m guessing probably not. This is likely what led him to write ASOIAF in the first place. Or at least one of the reasons. He had this huge world which he likely had spent years working on, but had never used it for anything. I’m guessing Westeros existed at least 10 years before he even started writing AGOT. That’s also why he’s been able to make his story so complicated, because much of the setting had already been done before he started.

Here’s the point I’m getting to. When he created his world he also, as any good world creator does, created a whole bunch of myths, legends, and fables to go with it. How many of these were true or partly true he left open. In other words, he didn’t necessarily create an actual backstory for each and every myth that appears in his world. Those familiar with the old D&D game world Greyhawk will understand what I mean. When Gary Gygax created his world he didn’t fill-in all of the blanks regarding every story or place. He intentionally left most open for people who played his world to fill-in for themselves. Thus his world would be unique for every group playing it. I think Martin has done the same thing. Many, if not most, of his legends probably don’t have a ‘true’ story.

For example: the story of ‘Brave Danny Flint’, the young girl who was so eager to join the Night’s Watch she disguised herself as a man who ended up being raped to death. Is this a true story? Or is it a tale a father invented to dissuade a pig-headed daughter from doing something stupid? It could be either, or neither. The point is that both are equally valid. It is entirely up to the reader to decide for themselves.

What this means is that my speculations and those of everyone else regarding the truth of the Long Night, the Bloodstone Emperor, Bran the Builder, and so on are all equally true. Or equally false. There may not be a  ‘correct’ version because there is none. Although it is likely at least a few of the more important ones have backstories. We will discover this if any of the prequels are ever made a reality. The rest we are free to speculate. I doubt that Martin will ever clear this up for us.